ECE 317 - Introduction to ECE Technology & Management

Semesters Offered

TitleRubricSectionCRNTypeHoursTimesDaysLocationInstructor
ECE Technology & ManagementECE317B57347LEC0800 - 0920 M W  2001 Business Instructional Fac Wei He

Documents

Official Description

Basic understanding of electrical and computer engineering concepts applicable to technology management. Circuit components; dc fundamentals; ac fundamentals; semiconductors; operational amplifiers; device fabrication; power distribution; digital devices; computer architecture (including microprocessors). Intended for the Business Majors in the Technology and Management program. Course Information: Credit is not given to Computer or Electrical Engineering majors. Prerequisite: One of MATH 220, MATH 221, MATH 234.

Subject Area

Core Curriculum

Course Director

Description

This course aims to provide a basic understanding of electrical and computer engineering concepts. An non-exclusive list of topics includes: basic circuit components, dc fundamentals, ac fundamentals, semiconductors, operational amplifies, device fabrication, power distribution, digital devices, and computer architecture (including microprocessors).

Notes

A relatively low level of mathematical ability (first term calculus) is assumed. This course is designed for Business Majors in the Technology and Management program.
Credit is not given to students enrolled in Electrical or Computer Engineering.

Goals

To equip non-engineering business-oriented students with the technical skills to become competitive as businesspersons in a technology-driven market.

Topics

  • Introduction to DC fundamentals
  • AC Fundamentals
  • Semiconductors
  • Integrated Circuit
  • Digital Logic
  • Computer Architecture (including microprocessors)

Detailed Description and Outline

To equip non-engineering business-oriented students with the technical skills to become competitive as businesspersons in a technology-driven market.

Topics:

  • Introduction to DC fundamentals
  • AC Fundamentals
  • Semiconductors
  • Integrated Circuit
  • Digital Logic
  • Computer Architecture (including microprocessors)

A relatively low level of mathematical ability (first term calculus) is assumed. This course is designed for Business Majors in the Technology and Management program.
Credit is not given to students enrolled in Electrical or Computer Engineering.

Texts

Recommended text: Dick White and Roger Doering, Electrical Engineering Uncovered, Prentice Hall 1997.

Steven Schwarz and William Oldham, Electrical Engineering, 2nd edition, Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovick, 1993.

Course Goals

The goal of this course is to equip non-engineering business-oriented students with the technical skills to become competitive as businesspersons in a technology-driven market. To accomplish this goal, this course will aim to provide a basic understanding of electrical and computer engineering concepts. This course is designed for the business majors in the Technology and Management program.

Instructional Objectives

A. After the first three weeks of class and the first laboratory experiment, the students should be able to do the following:

1. Perform fundamental DC circuit calculations (1, 2, 6, 7)

2. Measure voltage, current, resistance and power in DC circuits (5, 6)

3. Begin to develop an appreciation for the basic terminology and method of thinking used by engineers (3, 5)

B. After the first five weeks of class and laboratory experiment #2, the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A above, plus the following:

1. Perform fundamental AC circuit calculations (1, 2, 6, 7)

2. Measure input and output waveforms in elementary AC circuits including transformers and diodes (6, 6)

3. Begin to appreciate the operation of elementary electronics circuits (1, 2)

C. After the first twelve weeks of class and laboratory experiment #3, the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A and B above, plus the following:

1. Perform basic analysis of semiconductor device performance, including diodes, bipoloar junction transistors, and field effect transistors (1, 2, 6, 7)

2. Understand transistor amplification, and the difference between analog and digital configurations (1, 2, 6, 7)

3. Perform basic logic operation analysis on combinational and sequential logic circuits (1, 2, 6, 7)

4. Measure logic circuit performance (5, 6)

D. After the full 15 weeks of class, the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A, B, and C above, plus the following:

1. Understand from a electrical engineering perspective the basic component blocks of a computer (1, 2, 4, 6, 7).

Last updated

7/20/2018by James Andrew Hutchinson