ECE 205 - Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits

TitleRubricSectionCRNTypeHoursTimesDaysLocationInstructor
Electrical & Electronic CktsECE205AB139230LAB01100 - 1250 W  4074 ECE Building Zuofu Cheng
Electrical & Electronic CktsECE205AB239231LAB01100 - 1250 R  4074 ECE Building Zuofu Cheng
Electrical & Electronic CktsECE205AL30390LEC30850 - 0950 MTWRF  1013 ECE Building Zuofu Cheng

Official Description

ECE 205 is an introductory course on circuit analysis and electronics for non-majors in engineering. The course includes bi-weekly electronics lab experiments designed to provide students with hands-on experience. Basic principles of circuit analysis and DC circuits; time-domain analysis of 1st and 2nd order linear circuits; complex numbers, phasors, AC steady-state analysis; frequency response; op-amp, diode, and BJT circuits; logic gates and digital logic circuits. Credit is not given to Computer or Electrical Engineering majors. Course Information: Credit is not given to Computer or Electrical Engineering majors. Prerequisite: PHYS 212. Class Schedule Information: Students must register for one lecture and one lab.

Subject Area

Core Curriculum

Description

Basic principles of circuit analysis, transient analysis, AC steady-state analysis, introduction to semiconductor devices and fabrication, digital logic circuits, op-amps, and A/D and D/A conversion.

Notes

ECE students may not receive credit for this course.

Goals

This course is designed to give non-majors in engineering an introduction to electric circuits and microelectronic circuits.

Topics

  • Introduction: Charge, current, voltage, power, circuit elements, Ohm's law
  • Kirchhoff's current and voltage laws, voltage and current divisions
  • Node-voltage, mesh-current methods, superposition, and equivalence theorems
  • RC and RL circuits, first-order and second-order network, step response, transient and steady state response for sinusoidal inputs
  • Sinusoidal excitation and phasors
  • AC steady-state analysis and AC steady-state power
  • Frequency response, passive filters
  • Diodes, diode circuit analysis
  • BJT circuit analysis
  • BJT logic circuits
  • Propagation delay, rise and fall time, and noise margin
  • Op-amps and applications

Detailed Description and Outline

This course is designed to give non-majors in engineering an introduction to electric circuits, semiconductor devices, and microelectronic circuits.

Topics:

  • Introduction: Charge, current, voltage, power, circuit elements, Ohm's law
  • Kirchhoff's current and voltage laws, voltage and current divisions
  • Node-voltage, mesh-current methods, superposition, and equivalence theorems
  • RC and RL circuits, time domain analysis, step response, response to sinusoidal inputs
  • RLC circuits, time domain analysis, step response, response to sinusoidal inputs
  • Sinusoidal excitation and phasors
  • AC steady-state analysis and AC steady-state power
  • Frequency response, passive filters
  • Op-Amp - inverting and non-inverting Active Filter
  • Op-Amp- Integrator, Current Source Comparator
  • P-N Junction Diodes
  • Introduction to BJTs
  • Binary Logic and Logic Gates
  • Logic Gates Using BJTs

ECE students may not receive credit for this course.

Topical Prerequisites

  • Physics in electricity and magnetism
  • Differential and integral calculus
  • Linear, ordinary differential equations

Texts

Analog Signals and Systems, Erhan Kudeki and David C. Munson Jr.

ABET Category

Engineering Science: 100%

Course Goals

ECE 205 is an introductory course on circuit analysis and electronics for non-majors in engineering. The goals are to impart the fundamental principles of electric circuits and electronic circuits that constitute the foundation for preparing a non-major to take follow-on courses involving electric and electronic circuits.

Instructional Objectives

At the end of week 3, students should be able to do the following:

  • Calculate the currents and voltages in resistive circuits using Ohm’s law, KCL, KVL, reduction of series and parallel resistances, and voltage and current divisions (1)
  • Find the node voltages in resistive circuits containing current sources and voltage sources using nodal analysis (1)
  • Find the mesh currents and branch currents in resistive circuits containing voltage sources and current sources using mesh analysis (1)
  • Analyze resistive circuits containing multiple sources by using superposition (1)
  • Apply Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems to simplify a resistive circuit by finding the Thevenin or Norton equivalent of a two-terminal network (1)

At the end of week 6, students should be able to do the following:

  • Calculate the currents and voltages in a circuit containing diodes using the simple constant-voltage model for the diode(s) (1)
  • Determine the modes of operation of the BJTs and the on/off condition of the diodes, and calculate the voltages and currents in various simple BJT/diode circuits for given input voltages (1)
  • Determine the modes of operation of the BJT and calculate the voltages and currents in a BJT dc circuit, and find the power dissipated by the BJT (1)
  • Draw truth tables for basic logic operations, apply boolean algebra principles, and implement gate level logic circuits (1)

At the end of week 9, students should be able to do the following:

  • Determine the initial conditions of circuits containing capacitors and inductors using capacitor rules and inductor rules (1)
  • Calculate the currents and voltages of a first-order network containing a switch, and find the step response of a first-order network containing a step source (1)
  • Calculate the currents and voltages of a first-order network containing a switch, and find the transient of a first-order network containing to a sinusoidal forcing function. (1)
  • Calculate the currents and voltages of a second-order network containing a switch, and find the transient response of a second-order network containing a step function. (1)

At the end of week 12, students should be able to do the following:

  • Manipulate complex numbers and understand their meaning (1)
  • Find the phasor voltage (current) for a given sinusoidal voltage (current), and find the sinusoidal voltage (current) for given phasor voltage (current) and frequency (1)
  • Find the impedances of resistors, capacitors, and inductors for a given frequency ()
  • Analyze a phasor circuit using Ohm’s law, KCL, KVL, reduction of series and parallel impedances, and voltage and current divisions (1) Calculate the phasor voltages and currents in a phasor circuit by applying nodal analysis (1)
  • Find the phasor voltages and currents in a phasor circuit containing multiple sources using superposition (1)
  • Analyze magnetic circuits and circuits containing transformers. (1)

At the end of week 14, students should be able to do the following:

  • Derive and sketch the frequency response of a linear circuit or system. (1)
  • Analyze circuits containing Op-amps (ideal)– Differentiators, Integrators, active filters.(1)

Labs

Battery, internal resistance, and multimeter

At the end of week 4, students should be able to do the following:

  • Measure the voltage of a battery under no-load and loaded conditions using multimeter and basic breadboard circuit (1,3,5,6)
  • Use measurements to estimate internal resistance of battery (1,3,5,6)
  • Relate internal resistance of battery to change level of battery (1,3,5,6)

Diodes, photoresistor, photodiode

At the end of week 6, students should be able to do the following:

  • Build and document a light measuring circuit using a photoresistor (1,3,5,6)
  • Build and document a similar circuit using a photodiode and a transistor (1,3,5,6)
  • Measure the response of both circuits on the oscilloscope (1,3,5,6)
  • Explain the similarities and differences between each circuit (1,3,5,6)

555 Timer and Oscilloscope

At the end of week 8, students should be able to do the following:

  • Build and document an astable-multivibrator circuit using a 555, capacitors, and resistors (1,3,5,6)
  • Measure the response of the circuit using the oscilloscope (1,3,5,6)
  • Predict and measure the response of the circuit to changes in the resistors (1,3,5,6)

Filters and function generator

At the end of week 10, students should be able to do the following:

  • Predict, build, and measure (using the function generator and oscilloscope) the magnitude response of a R-C high pass filter (1,3,5,6)
  • Predict, build, and measure (using the function generator and oscilloscope) the magnitude response of a R-C low pass filter (1,3,5,6)
  • Predict and measure the effect of loading on each filter (1,3,5,6)

Op-amps

At the end of week 12, students should be able to do the following:

  • Build and document an op-amp amplifier (1,3,5,6)
  • Use oscilloscope to measure amplified audio-range signal from the function generator (1,3,5,6)
  • Hear, measure (on oscilloscope), and explain the effect of clipping due to excessive gain or too-low supply voltage (1,3,5,6)

Switch mode power supply and LCR bridge

At the end of week 14, students should be able to do the following:

  • Predict, wind, and measure the inductance of inductor using LCR bridge (1,3,5,6)
  • Build and document a boost converter circuit to light blue LED from 1.5 V battery using transistors, capacitors, inductors, and resistors (1,3,5,6)
  • Use oscilloscope to measure switching waveform and see effect of increasing or reducing the inductance (1,3,5,6)

Last updated

11/21/2018by Chandrasekhar Radhakrishnan