ECE 559 BH - Distributed Network Algorithms

Spring 2006

TitleRubricSectionCRNTypeHoursTimesDaysLocationInstructor
Topics in CommunicationsECE559BH44108LEC4 -    Bruce Hajek

Official Description

Lectures and discussion related to advanced topics and new areas of interest in the theory of communication systems, including information theory, coding theory, and communication network theory. Course Information: May be repeated in the same term as topics vary, to a maximum of 12 graduate hours; may be repeated in separate terms as topics vary, to a maximum of 16 graduate hours. Two or more sections of this course may be offered in a term with different outlines. Students registering in more than one section should receive credit separately for each section. Students will not receive additional credit toward a degree from multiple offerings of this course if those offerings have significant overlap, as determined by the Electrical and Computer Engineering department. Prerequisite: Specified each semester or consent of instructor. (It is expected that each offering will have a 500-level course as a prerequisite or co-requisite.)

Section Description

Topic: Distributed Network Algorithms. Prerequisites: CS 473, and ECE 534 or Math 466, or consent of instructor.

Subject Area

Communications

Course Director

Description

The course will juxtapose several topics loosely related to communication in large networks such as the Internet, and distributed coordination. The behavior of distributed network protocols, such as those for peer-to-peer networking, will be studied through the use of stochastic analysis methods. Forward error correction, such as digital fountain codes, and, more generally, network coding, are based on stochastic methods. One general application the course will focus on is simply the communication or storage of files. Another application is the problem of distributed scheduling or reservation of resources. The distributed nature of the applications, with tens, thousands, or even millions of interacting agents, suggests that ideas of game theory and mechanism design are relevant.

Each student will be expected to give one or two presentations of material during the semester (depending on enrollment). Grades will be based on homework (10%), classroom presentations by students (20%), a midterm and final exam (40%), and a project (30%).

Notes

Location:
TuTh 1:00-2:20 p.m. 336 Mechanical Engineering Building

Assigned Readings:,
Selected journal articles and portions of texts. No required text. The book R. Motwani and P. Raghavan, Randomized Algorithms, Cambridge University Press, 1995, is recommended.

Detailed Description and Outline

Location:
TuTh 1:00-2:20 p.m. 336 Mechanical Engineering Building

Assigned Readings:,
Selected journal articles and portions of texts. No required text. The book R. Motwani and P. Raghavan, Randomized Algorithms, Cambridge University Press, 1995, is recommended.

Last updated

2/13/2013