Videos

Advice to Graduates from Distinguished Alumni (2016 Edition)

Advice to Graduates from Distinguished Alumni (2016 Edition)

The 2016 winners of the ECE ILLINOIS Distinguished Alumni Award, Young Alumni Achievement Award, and Marcia Peterman ECE Award talk about what it means to be an engineer and give the class of 2016 advice. This video includes John Thode (BSEE '79), Chairman of Thode Residential Properties; Nancy Warter-Perez (MSEE '89, PhD '93), Professor of ECE at California State University Los Angeles; Gregg Zehr (MSEE '76, MSEE '77), President of Amazon Lab126; Mark Bohr (MSEE '78), Intel Senior Fellow; Thyaga Nandagopal (MSEE '00, PhD '02), Program Director at the National Science Foundation; and . Advice to Graduates from Distinguished Alumni Advice (2016 Edition) Know an outstanding ECE alumnus? Nominate them at http://www.ece.illinois.edu/alumni/awards/.

Holonyak at 90: Introductory Remarks

Holonyak at 90: Introductory Remarks

Celebrating Nick Holonyak at 90. Honoring him with words from: Tamer Basar, Interim Dean, Swanlund Endowed Chair and CAS Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering | Rashid Bashir, Incoming Dean Designate, Grainger Distinguished Chair in Engineering and former Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory Director | Wen-mei Hwu, AMD Jerry Sanders Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Acting Department Head, Electrical and Computer Engineering | Brian Cunningham, Director, MNTL and Donald Biggar Willett Professor in Engineering

Sensors and cyberphysical sensing networks for water and agriculture

Sensors and cyberphysical sensing networks for water and agriculture

The affordability of computing today, progress in nanomaterials and sensing devices, the increasing availability of data, and the emergence of low power wireless networks have made this an opportune time for the emergence of cyberphysical sensor networks for agriculture, water, and the environment. I will discuss three projects at different stages of development: (i) a two year pilot experiment with Gallo wineries and IBM that used satellite imagery data to calculate and then deliver water to vineyards in a pixelized manner via drip irrigation--resulting in improvements in yield and water efficiency; (ii), the development of Thoreau (Thoreau.uchicago.edu)-the first university based fully sub-terranean sensing network for soil that we have built at the University of Chicago, and (iii) a pilot project or temporal and geospatial mapping of water quality in the Godavari River in Southern India and other large water bodies throughout India. Through the descriptions of these projects I will try to argue that a key bottleneck for ubiquitous use of these technologies lies in the development of cheap, reliable, and scalable sensing packages. I will also describe a few of the key sensing challenges for water and agriculture, and some of our work on developing sensors based upon nanofabricated silicon photonics structures and the functionalization of capture surfaces. Presented on September 13, 2018, by Supratik Guha, Director of the Nanoscience and Technology Division and the Center for Nanoscale Materials at the Argonne National Laboratory, and a Professor at the Institute for Molecular Engineering The University of Chicago, as a guest of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

Big (Network) Data: Challenges and Opportunities for Data Science

Big (Network) Data: Challenges and Opportunities for Data Science

How do we draw sound and defensible conclusions from big data? This question lies at the heart of data science. In this talk I will first describe some of the challenges and opportunities inherent in this rapidly emerging field, and then discuss the current state of the art in one area of particular interest: big network data. Progress in this area includes the development of new large-sample theory that helps us to view and interpret networks as statistical data objects, along with the transformation of this theory into new statistical methods to model and draw inferences from network data in the real world. The insights that result from connecting theory to practice also feed back into pure mathematics and theoretical computer science, prompting new questions at the interface of combinatorics, analysis, probability, and algorithms. Presented on September 6, 2018, by Patrick J. Wolfe, Dean of Science at Purdue University, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

BRINGING AI TO A MICROCHIP NEAR YOU

BRINGING AI TO A MICROCHIP NEAR YOU

Cell phones, drones, laptops, and driverless cars can all use artificial intelligence (AI). For these devices to be fast and secure, the AI needs to be on-site. But most AI is stored in the cloud because it takes lots of energy to run. Come learn how this can change thanks to specialized microchips that use much less energy. BRINGING AI TO A MICROCHIP NEAR YOU Professor Naresh Shanbhag, ECE ILLINOIS Saturday Engineering for Everyone: May 31, 2018 Learn more about Saturday Engineering for Everyone at go.illinois.edu/SEE.

A Typical Day in 2030: Smartphones, smart homes, and smart cities

A Typical Day in 2030: Smartphones, smart homes, and smart cities

Come take a virtual tour of international labs working on the new technology that will shape our future. You?ll learn about exciting ideas like battery-free communication, wireless activity sensing, acoustic sound pockets, and cellular networks on drones. Presented by Professor Romit Roy Choudhury, W.J. "Jerry" Sanders III - Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Scholar in Electrical and Computer Engineering, ECE ILLINOIS Learn more about Saturday Engineering for Everyone at go.ece.illinois.edu/SEE.

Novel materials+novel integration=novel electronics

Novel materials+novel integration=novel electronics

We see the next evolution of semiconductor technology amalgamates with emerging applications of IoT, machine learning, precision medicine, and wearables. I will first discuss some of the material trends in leading-edge semiconductor technologies. I will describe a new research program that investigates applications of combining rigid semiconductor components with soft materials. Besides wearable technologies, there are new applications in RF communications, robotics, and medical technologies. I will describe some of my recent research work on wearable smart medical patches, soft energy harvesting composites, and ultra-thin materials for flexible electronics. Presented on April 26, 2018, by Professor Aaron Voon Yew Thean, ECE ILLINOIS alumnus, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium

AI: Making a brain out of data and compute

AI: Making a brain out of data and compute

Artificial intelligence is so important and revolutionary, it has been called ?the new electricity.? But how do you give a ?brain? to a machine? Learn how AI is developed using big data and big compute (computing power) and hear about what thinking computers might be like in the future. Presented by Assistant Professor Alex Schwing, ECE ILLINOIS, April 2018

Extreme photonics

Extreme photonics

Recent developments in nanotechnology, nanoscience, optical physics, and materials science have provided opportunities to construct structures with unprecedented attributes. We have been exploring a series of phenomena related to the wave-matter interaction in platforms with extreme scenarios, such as near-zero-index photonics in materials with effective permittivity, photonic doping, optical lumped nanocircuitry (?optical metatronics?), performing mathematical operations and analog computing with waves in specialized materials, geometry-independent resonant structures, one atom-thick optical structures based on graphene photonics, nonreciprocal vortices at subwavelength scales, large anisotropy and nonlinearity, lowindex? photonics, and more. Presented on April 12, 2018, by Professor Nader Engheta at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

Enhancing the resilience of largescale electric grids

Enhancing the resilience of largescale electric grids

Large-scale electric grids are an indispensable critical infrastructure. The impact of the loss of a portion of the electric grid ranges from minor inconveniences to potentially catastrophic when the blackout covers a large region for a long duration. Keeping the lights on involves designing and operating the electric grid with a goal of simultaneously increasing both reliability and resiliency. This talk considers how to enhance resiliency, with a focus on the impact of what the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) calls High Impact, Low Frequency (HILF) events. Examples include large-scale cyber or physically attacks, pandemics, electromagnetic pulses (EMPs), and geomagnetic disturbances (GMDs). Presented on April 5, 2018, by Professor Thomas J. Overbye at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium

Quanta Image Sensor: megapixel photon counting image sensor

Quanta Image Sensor: megapixel photon counting image sensor

The talk will begin with a discussion on the CMOS image sensor ? its invention, underlying principles, and commercialization. The Quanta Image Sensor (QIS) is a possible 3rd generation solid-state image sensor technology based on photon-counting. Primarily focused on scientific and defense applications, it may also be useful for consumer applications. The specialized QIS pixel device and its deep sub-electron read noise will be discussed. The specialized pixel uses ultra-low capacitance rather than avalanche multiplication to achieve single photoelectron detection capability. The high frame rate, low power readout will also be described. The QIS opens new possibilities for computational imaging. Presented on March 29, 2018, by Professor Eric R. Fossum, Dartmouth, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

Hashing-based data structures and applications

Hashing-based data structures and applications

Learn about hashing-based data structures, including invertible Bloom lookup tables and cuckoo filters. Engineering ideas (how to best make use of bits), algorithmic ideas (the importance of peeling algorithms), and mathematical ideas (why double hashing works as well as perfect hashing) will be covered. Presented on March 15, 2018, by Professor Michael Mitzenmacher, Harvard University, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the 2018 Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

MEMS and NEMS switches for power and logic

MEMS and NEMS switches for power and logic

MEMS/NEMS sensors such as accelerometers, gyroscopes, microphones, pressure sensors, and biochemical sensors have transformed industries. Yet, with limited exceptions, MEMS/NEMS actuators have not yet been similarly transformative. MEMS power relays have now demonstrated kilovolt blocking voltages and several-ampere conduction currents, while offering mechanical bistability and rapid triggering. NEMS relays are close to operating at sufficiently low voltages to challenge low-power transistors in terms of switching energy. Explore the high-power and lowpower capabilities of MEMS/NEMS switches, or relays, using residential circuit breakers and low-power digital logic as benchmarks. Presented on March 1, 2018, by Professor Jeffrey H. Lang, MIT, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the 2018 Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium

Integrated circuit scaling to 10 nm and beyond - Mark Bohr, Intel

Integrated circuit scaling to 10 nm and beyond - Mark Bohr, Intel

Scaling transistors and following Moore?s Law have served our industry well for more than 50 years in providing integrated circuits that are denser, cheaper, higher performance, and lower power. Despite occasional reports of its demise, Moore?s Law is alive and well. We?ve continually invented new materials and new device structures to deliver the expected benefits of scaling, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. This presentation describes Intel?s latest 10 nm logic technology and some of the device options being explored in research for future scaling. Presented on January 25, 2018, by alumnus Mark Bohr (MSEE '78), Intel Senior Fellow and Director of Process Architecture and Integration, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the 2018 Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

Networking coding

Networking coding

"Networking coding: a personal account of combining theory and practice" Network Coding (NC) affords relaxation of constraints and creates opportunities for improved resource usage. Introducing Random Linear Network Coding (RLNC) into TCP requires an inventive reinterpretation of control signals, but recent theoretical results on equivalence theory at MIT show that there is no throughput benefit in combining NC with physical media codes. Come explore the results from the first chip implementation of NC to see how coding is possible at both layers without requiring coordination between them. You?ll also discuss open challenges and research directions driven by the coming convergence of data storage and networking. Presented on November 2, 2017, by Professor Muriel Medard, MIT, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the 2017 Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

NASA cyclone global navigation satellite system

NASA cyclone global navigation satellite system

"Early on-orbit results for the NASA cyclone global navigation satellite system" The CYGNSS constellation of eight satellites was successfully launched in December 2016 into a low inclination (tropical) Earth orbit. Each satellite carries a four-channel bistatic radar receiver that measures GPS signals scattered by the ocean, from which ocean surface roughness, near surface wind speed, and air-sea latent heat flux are estimated. Engineering commissioning of the constellation was completed in March 2017, and the mission is currently in the early phase of science operations. Come learn the status of the mission and highlights of early on-orbit performance and scientific results, especially those related to the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. Presented on October 26, 2017, by Professor Chris Ruf, University of Michigan, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the 2017 Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

Whispering-gallery-mode microresonators

Whispering-gallery-mode microresonators

Light-matter interactions are the fundamental basis for many phenomena and processes in optical devices. Ultra-high-quality whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) optical micro-resonators provide unprecedented capability to trap light in a highly confined volume smaller than a strand of human hair. Come learn the recent progress being made toward developing functional platforms using high-Q WGM microresonators and microlasers, explore an interesting hybrid nanoparticle-resonator system, and see a new hand-held platform that might help release the power of high-Q WGM resonator technologies. Presented on October 19, 2017, by Professor Lan Yang, Washington University, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the 2017 Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

New frontiers for wave manipulation

New frontiers for wave manipulation

Metamaterials provide unprecedented opportunities to tailor and enhance the interaction between waves with materials. Come learn about recent research in electromagnetics, nanooptics and acoustics, showing how suitably tailored meta-atoms and arrangements of them open exciting venues to manipulate and control waves in unprecedented ways. Theoretical and experimental results will be presented, including metamaterials for scattering suppression, metasurfaces to control wave propagation and radiation, large nonreciprocity without magnetic bias, giant nonlinearities in properly tailored metamaterials and metasurfaces, and active metamaterials. Presented on September 21, 2017, by Professor Andrea Alu, The University of Texas at Austin, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the 2017 Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

Humans, machines, and work: the future is now

Humans, machines, and work: the future is now

Automation, driven by technological progress, has been increasing inexorably for the past several decades. Two schools of economic thinking have for many years been engaged in a debate about the potential effects of automation on jobs: will new technology spawn mass unemployment, as the robots take jobs away from humans? Or will the jobs robots take over create demand for new human jobs? Vardi presents data demonstrating that the concerns about automation are valid. In fact, technology has been hurting working Americans for the past 40 years. The discussion about humans, machines and work tends to be a discussion about some undetermined point in the far future. But it is time to face reality. The future is now. Presented on September 14, 2017, by Professor Moshe Vardi, Rice University, at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign as part of the 2017 Distinguished Colloquium series. Learn more at https://ece.illinois.edu/calendar/colloquium.

Fun with Photons

Fun with Photons

How does your phone send pictures to Facebook? How does information travel through the internet? Photonics. Photonics, where light is used to transmit information, have created a revolution in the way we communicate. Researchers at the University of Illinois have been part of it, developing miniature lasers which are central to the photonic revolution. Learn about the semiconductor laser and a device that is much smaller than a grain of sugar. Plus you'll learn about applications of this laser (i.e. how to make money). April 15, 2017 Presented by Prof. Kent Choquette, ECE ILLINOIS

Drones Are Taking Off in Construction

Drones Are Taking Off in Construction

Did you know that construction teams used drones while working on McCormick Place in Chicago? Learn how cameras in the sky create 3D images that help major construction projects stay on track and on budget. Whether you're interested in drone images, architecture, or construction, this talk is filled with real-world examples and images you won't want to miss. Saturday, March 4, 2017 Presented by Prof. Golparvar Fard, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dr. Lynford Goddard recognized for Leadership in Diversity at University of Illinois

Dr. Lynford Goddard recognized for Leadership in Diversity at University of Illinois

ECE ILLINOIS Associate Professor Lynford L Goddard was honored with the 2016 Leadership in Diversity Larine Y. Cowan ?Make a Difference Award? at the University of Illinois Office of Diversity, Equity, and Access (ODEA)'s 31st Annual Celebration of Diversity. Learn more about his work at http://www.ece.illinois.edu/newsroom/article/19777.

YOU SAY YOU WANT A REVOLUTION: THE LASTING IMPACT OF BARDEEN AND HOLONYAK

YOU SAY YOU WANT A REVOLUTION: THE LASTING IMPACT OF BARDEEN AND HOLONYAK

The bipolar junction transistor and light emitting diode are two innovations that have made a profound impact on the world. Professors John Bardeen and Nick Holonyak Jr., the respective inventors of these technologies, have also made a lasting impact on ECE ILLINOIS, where they spent the majority of their careers. This talk will review the men and their impact ? both local and global ? and will also look at some of the current work that ties their contributions together. Saturday Engineering for Everyone, April 2, 2016

ASTRONOMICAL TELESCOPES AND OUR PLACE IN THE UNIVERSE | Saturday Engineering for Everyone

ASTRONOMICAL TELESCOPES AND OUR PLACE IN THE UNIVERSE | Saturday Engineering for Everyone

The telescope was invented a bit more than 400 years ago. Galileo's use of one for astronomy revolutionized our understanding of the universe and of terrestrial phenomena. The first telescopes were primitive, and each technological advance enabled new discoveries. Thaler will describe the history of these advances and what is planned for the future. Saturday Engineering for Everyone, Feb. 27, 2016

Dispelling the Myths about Nuclear Power

Dispelling the Myths about Nuclear Power

Professor David Ruzic's Saturday Engineering for Everyone talk, "Dispelling the Myths about Nuclear Power," was Feb. 13, 2016, in the ECE Building on the University of Illinois campus.

LAUNCH Beyond Keynote: Yi-Min Wang

LAUNCH Beyond Keynote: Yi-Min Wang

Yi-Min Wang (MS '90, PhD '93), distinguished scientist scientist and managing director of Microsoft Research Technologies, gave the keynote at ECE LAUNCH Beyond on Nov. 6, 2015.

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